Your Choice – Infection Control Training

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AFTER READING THE POLICY ON INFECTION CONTROL, PLEASE GO TO THE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT BY CLICKING THE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT BUTTON.  ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF THE INFECTION CONTROL POLICY MUST BE RENEWED EVERY CALENDAR.

INFECTION CONTROL TRAINING ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

INFECTION CONTROL POLICY (2015)

Non-medical in-home personal care personnel face considerable challenges when attempting to implement standard infection control practices in the home setting. Unlike hospitals and long-term care facilities, space is often limited and cleaning of the environment is not under the control of the care provider. Your Choice Senior Care employees can be subject to uncontrolled and unpredictable events and circumstances.

EQUIPMENT

1. Personal protective equipment provided as needed to the employee by the Your Choice Senior Care should include the following:
a. Disposable non-sterile or sterile gloves
b. Utility gloves
c. Disinfectants recommended for blood or body substance spills, including the following:
(1) Chemical germicides that are approved for use as agency disinfectants and are tuberculocidal when used at recommended dilutions
(2) Products registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with an accepted label that are effective against hepatitis B
(3) A solution of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (household bleach) diluted to 1:10 parts with tap water; mix a fresh supply of bleach every day for effective disinfection
e. Masks, disposable cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) masks, goggles, National Institute of
Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved respiratory protection devices, moisture-proof aprons or gowns, shoe covers, caps, and an extra uniform stocked in the car
f. Liquid soap (bacteriocidal), soap towelettes, dry hand disinfectants (bleach and alcohol based), hand lotion
g. Paper towels
h. Plastic bags with a seal and marked with a biohazard sign for use when transporting laboratory specimens
i. Leak-proof and puncture-proof containers marked with a biohazard sign on the outside of the containers for use when transporting laboratory specimens
j. Sharps containers
k. Large plastic container or cardboard box to store nursing bag and supplies in trunk of field staff car
l. Impermeable plastic trash bags for soiled dressings, etc.
m. Sterile bottled water

PROCEDURE

Hand washing
The hands should be washed before and after patient contact. The hands are to be washed during patient care if they become soiled. Wash the hands with liquid soap and water immediately after removing gloves. If soap and water are not available, use antiseptic hand cleanser or towelettes. The hands should then be washed with soap and water as soon as possible. See specific procedure for handwashing for further recommendations.

Gloves
Wear gloves if the possibility of contact transmission may occur. Change gloves between each patient procedure or when going from dirty to clean. Wear disposable non-sterile non-latex gloves when performing any clinical procedure that may expose you to the patient’s blood or other body substances. Sterile disposable non-latex gloves are to be worn during certain clinical procedures that require sterile technique. Sterile and non-sterile non-latex disposable gloves are to be disposed of after each use in a leak resistant waste receptacle, such as a plastic trash bag.

Impermeable Plastic Trash Bag
Place all soiled dressings, disposable gloves, etc. in an impermeable plastic trash bag, and then secure it. Place the trash bag in the family trash. Follow federal, state, and local ordinances regarding disposal of bio hazardous waste in the community.

Masks
Disposable face masks are to be worn whenever there is a reasonable expectation that droplet transmission may occur. Dispose of masks after each use. When respiratory isolation is required, post a homemade “STOP” sign outside the sick patient’s room. Instruct the family, caregivers, and/or visitors to wear masks when entering the room and/or when caring for the sick patient. The STOP sign should alert everyone, including children, of the necessity to wear a mask when entering the sick patient’s room.

Goggle or face shields
Goggles or face shields are to be worn when there is a reasonable expectation that droplet transmission may occur to the eyes. Clean the goggles or shields according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, and discard when physical damage or any other condition renders them unsuitable for use.

Uniform
Your Choice Senior Care employees are responsible for keeping an extra (clean) uniform secured in a water-resistant bag in their car. If a uniform becomes soiled during patient care, change into the clean uniform as soon as possible. Place the soiled uniform in a leak-proof plastic bag, and launder.

Principles of Cleaning, Disinfecting, and Sterilizing in the Home
All equipment must be cleaned thoroughly to remove organic material before disinfection or sterilization.
Routine disinfection practices in the home may include the use of the following:
•Bleach
•Hydrogen peroxide
•Boiling water
•Hot, soapy water
•Phenolic resin (e.g., Lysol)
•Isopropyl alcohol (70%)
•Acetic acid (white vinegar)

Patient/Family Laundry
Laundry should be handled as little as possible and with minimum agitation to prevent gross microbial contamination of the air and of the persons handling the linen. Place linens soiled with blood or body fluids in a leak-resistant bag at the location where care was given. Wash soiled linens in hot, soapy water with a bleach solution, separate from the family wash.

Personal
Eating, drinking, smoking, applying cosmetics or lip balm, and handling contact lenses are prohibited in patient care areas where there is reasonable likelihood of occupational exposure to blood or body substances. Food and drinks are not to be kept in patient care areas where blood or other potentially infectious materials are present.

Miscellaneous
All clinical procedures shall be performed in a manner that minimizes splashing, spraying, splattering, or generating droplets of blood or body substances. Mouth pipetting/suctioning of blood or other body substances is prohibited.

Immunizations
It is recommended that all staff involved in direct patient care (e.g., touching, working with patients/caregivers) be immunized against hepatitis B. In addition, ACIP strongly recommends that all staff be vaccinated against (or have documented immunity to) influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella.

PLEASE SIGN THE INFECTION CONTROL POLICY ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM AND RETURN TO THE HR ADMINISTRATOR

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